Stroke Survivors Support Group: May 18, 2017

May 15th, 2017 by Doris Bersing

Informational session facilitated by guest speaker Dr. Peter Nelson, physician and stroke survivor

Kaiser Permanente, 450 6th Avenue, 1st Floor Room Board, San Francisco, CA 94118

Parkinson’s Disease Support Group: May 9, 2017

May 6th, 2017 by Doris Bersing

Therapy Session by Living Well Assisted Living At Home

Kaiser Permanente, 4141 Geary Boulevard Room F1 (between 5th and 6th Avenue), San Francisco, CA 94118

Stroke Survivors Support Group: April 20, 2017

April 17th, 2017 by Doris Bersing

Therapy session facilitated by Living Well

Kaiser Permanente, 450 6th Avenue, 1st Floor Room Board, San Francisco, CA 94118

Parkinson’s Disease Support Group: April 11, 2017

April 8th, 2017 by Doris Bersing

Informational Session presented by Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente, 4141 Geary Boulevard Room F1 (between 5th and 6th Avenue), San Francisco, CA 94118

Fall Prevention…How? April 28, 2017

April 5th, 2017 by Doris Bersing
Living Well Proudly Presents Dr. John Fullerton, MD and Hampton Health, Ltd
Falls don’t “just happen,” and people don’t fall because they get older. Often, more than one underlying cause or risk factor is involved in a fall. As the number of risk factors rises, so does the risk of falling. Many falls are linked to a person’s physical condition or a medical problem, such as a chronic disease. Let Dr. Fullerton explain how a fall could be a sign of a new medical problem that needs attention, such as an infection or a cardiovascular disorder. It could also suggest that a treatment or interventions for a chronic ailment, such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, needs to be changed.

Speakers: John H. Fullerton, MD and Minoo Parsa, BS

Dr. Fullerton is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Geriatrics, Hospice, Palliative Medicine, and Addiction Medicine, as well as board certified Medical Review Officer, Medical Director, Forensic Physician, and Home Care Physician. A primary care physician and clinician educator for 26+ years, Dr. Fullerton is the Co-Founder and CMO for Hampton Health., which specializes in ambulatory and urgent care, including a focus on the transitions of care between acute, rehabilitative & hospitalbased SNF, secured Dementia Units, Assisted and Independent Living Facilities, Home Care, and Hospice & Palliative Care. Minoo Parsa is the Founder of Fall Prevention and Dizziness Therapy a program she established in November 2016 and which has become a trademark of Hampton Health.

Date & Time
Friday, April 28, 2017
3:30 — 5:30pm
Location
The Coventry Place — 5th Floor
1550 Sutter Street
San Francisco, CA 94109
RSVP
1.800.805.7104 or events@LivingWellAH.com

Refreshments will be served.

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Age-Associated Changes in Metabolism

March 22nd, 2017 by Doris Bersing

How our bodies process the food we eat

It doesn’t matter how fast or slow your metabolism is between the ages of 10-30, you’ve probably heard that it’s a slippery slide into obesity past that point. Aunts and moms are generally those who love sharing nuggets of wisdom such as, “enjoy it while you can” and “after 30 it’s all downhill”. Based on that, we could conclude that there is some magical change that happens at the exact moment we celebrate our 30th birthday, causing the body’s metabolism to suddenly slow down to a crawl. Though it’s true that metabolism slows down with age, there’s no single turning point or cause why that happens.

We cannot deny that our metabolism has its ownups and downs. However, there’s no reason to fear any particular birthday more than any other when it comes to the way the body functions. The metabolism slows down as we age. That happens because it goes hand in hand with hormonal changes that happen over the course of years and decades.

Hormonal changes and a slowing metabolism are fundamental parts of aging, but there are ways to stave off both, if only for a little bit. Read on to find out what experts have to say about the process of metabolism slowing down and what healthy habits help curb that.

Metabolism is the speed with which the body turns calories from food into usable energy

No matter what we’re doing, our bodies are hard at work doing things such as extracting oxygen from the air, healing damaged cells and pumping out hormones. For all that, the body uses calories, and their combined worth in a single day is called “basal metabolic rate” (BMR). This differs from one individual to another, and a way to find out your BMR is to have your doctor check it for you or use an online calculator.

You will spend more calories when jogging, doing pushups or sprinting, but your BMR value tends to remain constant, since it’s controlled by your hormones. Genes, gender, body type and age also affect the BMR. As we grow older, the hormones within our bodies begin to change, affecting the way our bodies burn calories and store fat. When hormones are released in different quantities, our basal metabolic rate begins to fluctuate.

Biggest metabolic rate changes are related to menopause

The metabolism tends to grind to a halt way after 30, and generally around menopause. The average women see their metabolisms change is at the age of 50, when they get into menopause. The most notable hormone responsible for metabolism is estrogen. When it starts decreasing, the metabolism takes a big hit. Harvard Health also mentions the human growth hormone (HGH), released from the pituitary gland. It also slows down to a trickle as we grow older, since it regulates our muscle mass and fat burning. Muscles tend to grow slower as we age and break up faster. Since muscles are more metabolically active than fat cells, they are a huge factor in whether your BMR will slow down or speed up.

Post-30 weight gain is mostly due to lifestyle changes

People’s metabolisms slowly decline throughout 30s and 40s, but the weight gain is mostly caused by general lifestyle changes that you might not be aware of. We love to exercise in our 20s, but as we age and get to 30, we lose interest because we’re too focused on our careers or kids.

The silver lining: Faster metabolism is related to more physical activity

You can’t escape your genes, but you can take care of your body to make a difference. Even if someone has good genes and has looked skinny their entire life, a lack of physical exercise and proper dieting may trigger weight gain. It’s very important to try and restore muscle mass.

Eating healthy foods, drinking plenty of water, and working out can help the metabolism get back on track. Why wait for your body to break down, when you can look and feel amazing at 50? Sure there might be lots of nursing homes near me just waiting for seniors to jump in, but if you eat right and exercise, you can live alone at home and be healthy. That’s the definition of a fulfilled lifestyle!

Stroke Survivors Support Group: March 16, 2017

March 13th, 2017 by Doris Bersing

Informational session facilitated by Kaiser Permanente on “Post-Stroke Fatigue” — guest speaker Dr. Meghan Littlepage, MD of El Camino Hospital

Kaiser Permanente, 450 6th Avenue, 1st Floor Room Board, San Francisco, CA 94118