‘Institutional Living’ Posts

Can the Health Care Reform Really Help with Long Term Care?

October 24th, 2016 by Doris Bersing

healthcare reformThe health care system plays a very important role for every country around the world. Through well-established rules and laws as well as a good health reform, the long term care can and should be constantly improved. This way, every citizen of every country might benefit from the best health care conditions no matter the situation. There are numerous factors that add up to the equation. All of these highly influence the overall results of the quality of national long term care. Let’s analyze this more in detail below.

The Effects of the Well-being of the Families on the Stability of the National Economy

A good, effective health care system is first of all good for the citizens of any country or better said for any human being on Earth. We all need medical care sooner or later and a perfectly established system can only prove to be beneficial for us. Moreover, when families in a certain state are doing well from this point of view as well as others, this is also highly beneficial for the overall quality of the national economy.

All these factors go hand in hand. As a result, when all details are carefully considered, the end-results are noticeable and beneficial both for the citizens and the country they live in. The nation’s economic stability highly depends on the well-being of its inhabitants. Moreover, it is also influenced by proper support systems ensured for people dealing with health disabilities. These focus on offering them the chance to integrate well in society.

The state in itself could not help with long term care better than by imposing effective health reforms. These should be developed for the citizens and by keeping their needs and requirements as the main concern and focus. The factors involved in this case are numerous and varied. However, proper care for patients should always be on top of the list. As a result, every new rule and any new system should come accordingly.

A Good Health Reform for Restoring National Prosperity

The reality is that many people are skeptical when they hear about the health reform. Their concerns are not necessarily related to the existence of the health reform but rather to how effective it might actually be for the overall national well-being.

There is nothing wrong with the concept itself. However, it is more than important to make sure that the rules will ensure the well-being of the country and its citizens. Moreover, such changes should not bring any negative effects or leave any type of needs uncovered. The purpose is to restore prosperity for families as well as the national economy and the fiscal health.

A well-established health reform developed by specialists with both theoretical and practical experience is essential. Furthermore, it will ensure affordable health care for everyone. Moreover, it is also vital for slowing general price growth in the case of health entitlement programs

expenditure

Focus on the Needs of People Who Need Long-Term Care

When it comes to long-term care, a health reform becomes even more important and necessary. Why is that? Because these people need a perfect system to ensure that their needs are fully covered the entire period of time they need proper care. It is not about going to the doctor for a single visit or treatment in their case. They need constant assistance, proper medication availability and prescriptions. They also need people specialized in offering them the support they need.

Furthermore, the need for long-term care is not just limited to people reaching their senior age. There are also numerous adults and young people dealing with health issues that require long-term care. A health reform should include all these situations and establish the perfect conditions for all citizens. No need to just encourage families to plan ahead. These people need serious, realistic solutions that will be advantageous both for them and the national economy system.

A Serious National Concern

All in all, the great majority of Medicaid spending goes for appropriate services for long-term care patients. A good health reform could target such needs of the population. This would allow it to strengthen the healthcare requirements of the citizens thus ensure a stronger Medicaid system for the future.

There arealso certain Medicaid post-acute type of care services that could find place in the system. These could fill-in for certain long-term care needs that might be uncovered at the moment due to system breaches. There are effective solutions to find and adopt such as good care homes in London but this is only possible through a well-established system like the national health reform.

Living at Home and Understanding Dementia Symptoms

April 23rd, 2015 by Doris Bersing

Understanding DementiaHaving a loved one diagnosed with dementia, including Alzheimer’s,  is a very hard circumstance and can be very challenging. Most of the times you want to keep them living at home, and provide the home care for the dementia or Alzheimer’s care they need. However, people get distanced from the one suffering from Dementia since they can barely recognize you; thus it is important to understand the symptoms of dementia and become a step closer to your elderly parents.

Nobody wants to see their aging parent struggle with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Sadly, there are things in life we can’t control, like incurable diseases that could materialize after a certain age. When someone gets dementia, their relationships, priorities, and perceptions on life take an unexpected turn. Nevertheless, certain forms of dementia can be kept under control, reversed and even treated if caught on time. If you have an aging parent, it’s only natural to become concerned with their wellbeing. Are they eating right? Are they becoming more forgetful? Are they in pain? These are questions most concerned children ask themselves on a daily basis.

A 70-year old parent may forget things from time to time, but if you notice that their memory loss becomes intense, then it might be a cause of cognitive decline. Dementia can be identified in many ways. First, you must understand the disease. The more you know the higher chances you have to save your parent and stop the health condition from advancing.

Understanding symptoms of dementia

Dementia is not a sole health condition but a collection of numerous symptoms, and some of the most common are changes in personality, memory loss, and impaired intellectual functions that could result from trauma or disease to the brain. These changes are not normal aging signs, and their side effects are severe enough to impact someone’s daily living, relationships and independence forever. Even though Alzheimer’s is one of the most widespread forms of dementia, there are many others, including mixed and vascular dementia.

If you suspect that your parent may suffer from this dreadful illness, then some of the changes will be noticeable. Remembering, communication, learning and problem solving will become difficult endeavors to accomplish. These are changes that can happen fast, or develop slowly in time. The outcome and progression of dementia differ, but are mainly determined by the form of dementia suffered and side of the brain affected. A specialist in the medical field will provide a complete diagnosis after the patient has undergone a series of tests, clinical exams, and brain scans.

What triggers dementia?

A healthy brain’s mass begins to decline in adulthood. However, this fascinating organ-machine of ours keeps forming vital connections even if we age, thus keeping us sane. When these connections are misplaced because of injury, inflammation, or disease, brain neurons begin to die. The result – dementia; it’s certainly traumatic to see a loved one go through such a horrifying disease. This is why it is important for adults to interfere as soon as the first signs materialize in their aging parent. The faster a doctor understands the cause, the better chances he has to recommend a treatment.

Caring for a parent with dementia

In the United States, there are roughly 10 million people who take care of a parent with dementia. Most of these at-home caregivers are women. It’s tough to do this job and at the same time have a family on your own. But since we’re talking about a parent, you wouldn’t want anyone else to take care of them.

Becoming a caregiver to a sick parent is tough. If you’re an adult and you have kids, you must accept that your aging parent may also have the behavior of a 5-year old. Given that dementia affects the brain, memory loss is not the only disturbing symptom. Many adults don’t want to move their loved one to a nursing home. In general, it’s not because they can’t afford the costs but because they’ve over protective.

Professional care can be good for an elderly suffering from dementia

The option of Home care or aging in pace and caring at home for people with dementia or Alzheimer’s is still an option for some. However, one size does not fit all. Living Well Assisted Living at Home in San Francisco and Marin County recognizes that home care for senior with dementia is an alternative but also, believe it or not, today’s healthcare facilities and nursing homes are no longer what they used to be. Some of these hospices provide exceptional comfort. They also feature all kinds of activities for patients, and they have professional personal taking care of your loved one 24/7. Making the decision and moving your parent to a facility is not something you want to do. But it is necessary.

Only an equipped facility can offer the best care for your loved one. At-home caregiving is great, but it’s still not enough to make the patient feel appreciated. A specialized facility comes with lots of programs, socializing sessions, and other therapies meant to stimulate your parent’s brain and ensure he remains in good physical health for as long as possible.

In collaboration with  Edward Francis and Foresthc.com!

Our Long-Term Care Journey

April 14th, 2015 by Doris Bersing

Aging in PlaceMaking a life-changing decision on a loved one’s long-term care and considering a nursing home or assisted living facility is never easy and there are many hurdles that must be overcome. For many, this may not be necessary as they will receive the care they require in the comfort of their own home, which is certainly the first option for a large percentage of seniors receiving care.

According to an AARP study 89% of those 65 and older would love to age in place for as long as possible, and there are several important benefits of aging at home, like improved health, routine, independence and the familiar setting. If medically and financially possible, there is no place like home. In-home care can be affordable, when limited in services and in number of hours per day.

For low income seniors, there are several programs, like the In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program, the Cash and Counsel program, or if you or your family member is a US veteran, the VA administration for veterans may cover a variety of in home care services in your state. Services that are typically covered by these programs include, health care, personal care, homemaker care, adult day care, transportation, medical equipment and some minor home remodeling.

For those that prefer a group setting, or home care is not appropriate and/or affordable, and the family feels that a nursing home or assisted living facility would be the be the best fit, obviously there are many emotional issues that need to be dealt with. Often there are conflicting emotions raging, including, guilt, anger, sadness and helplessness, when they are no longer able to provide the care that their loved ones now require.

Another area that needs to be navigated when considering a nursing home, is how to pay the bill, which for many American families is financially out of reach even after saving up for a considerable number of years. The same situation arises with home care services; unless the person has savings, equity in their home, or Long Term care Insurance, cost can be an issue. The federal and state governments provide Medicaid/Medical help if the individual meets all financial and medical eligibility guidelines. There is often a grueling task, companies like Senior Planning Services could help you with the Medicaid application process, or you can address your local Medicaid office, often, with the risk of failure quite high.

Last but no least, there are considerations as far as choosing the right nursing home or assisted living facility for mom or dad, to the right in-home care agency that will take into account all personal, cultural, religious and location-based preferences. This accumulation of stress is enough to inundate any sane person, but for the nearly 65 million heroic individuals providing care in the US for a loved one, this is often the best care option for the senior.Having worked for many years as a nursing home placement coordinator for a NJ-based Medicaid planning company, I’d like to share the personal saga of one of our clients which touched me deeply.

Several months ago I was contacted by a woman living in northern New Jersey. Her mom, who resided in central NJ in Ocean County, was suffering from severe dementia and the daughter wanted her admitted to a nursing home in her own area, up in northern NJ, in Bergen County. In addition to her dementia, the elderly woman also had severe behavioral issues.

The family was in the Medicaid application process and their application was in the pending status. Because of her unique needs, our options were quite limited. We needed a nursing home with a secure unit where the residents could not wander out of the unit, since a wander guard would not have been sufficient for this woman. Dementia patients tend to become so confused and lost in their surroundings, that they will try to leave the premises even when wheelchair bound.

The woman, as we mentioned earlier, also had violent tendencies and would sometimes act disrespectfully, hit other residents and caregivers, and needed a nursing facility that was equipped for these needs. These issues made finding the right facility a nightmare.

When we did find one or two, we were turned down, since our Medicaid status was still pending and not all nursing homes were willing to work with Medicaid-pending applicants.

In the meantime, we found placement for the woman in a nursing home in the Ocean County area which was able to provide all of her needs. I had a good working relationship with this facility and, after some cajoling, they accepted her, confident that the Medicaid application would be approved. It didn’t satisfy the requests of the daughter, though, who wanted mom close by.

When the Medicaid application was subsequently approved, we were successful in transferring the woman to a facility closer to her daughter in Bergen County. We were all very excited that it had worked out well for everybody, at last. The daughter thanked me profusely for the effort I had expended in making it happen.

It was heartbreaking when, days later, the woman passed away at the facility…

Conclusion: You know, as professionals, we try to maintain a certain degree of detachment in order to be better able to assist our clients, but at the end of the day… it’s painful. We do develop relationships with the wonderful people whose long-term care is entrusted to us and when they go so quickly, it’s like losing a friend or relative, in a sense.

In collaboration with Benjamin Lamm, a senior advocate.

Aging in Place versus Traditional Nursing Homes

August 5th, 2014 by Doris Bersing

Aging in PlaceShould a time arrive when you realize that you need help in continuing to provide a safe and joy-filled environment that ensures the physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of your elderly loved one, you have several choices; two of these include: moving your loved one into a nursing home or securing the professional services of an aging in place or  assisted-living-at-home agency. As an article in the NY Times affirms, both of these options include the presence of new people in the life of your loved one on a daily basis; however, how that service is provided and when it’s provided makes all the difference between the two.

There are perks for each senior care scenario, but what’s important is to make the decision that gives the best care to what your elderly loved one needs most. Do they have physical pain and are prone to serious injury? What is their state of mental health and what would help improve or comfort that? How much attention do they really need and how capable are they to still do things themselves? All these questions are just the surface of what needs to be asked to make the right decision.

Individualized Care, Attention, & Focus

A traditional nursing home is required to have one RN on staff 7 days a week for 8 hours a day; the rest of the time a licensed LPN or RN must be on duty; in addition, the nursing home must employ a registered nurse for the full-time role of Director of Nursing. According to Elder Law Answers, there is no minimum requirement for the number of nurses’ aides during a shift. Since the aides are the workers who provide most of the personal day-to-day care for the residents, it’s not impractical to think that each individual resident at a nursing home is being provided with hours of focused, one-to-one care and attention.  The article goes on to share, “The important factor in improving the quality of care is the amount of nurse time each patient receives. If a nursing home met only the federal nurse staffing requirements…a resident would receive 20 minutes of nurse time per day.”

Quite the opposite is true with an assisted-living-at-home service. With this option, you and your loved one decide how much one-to-one care is required or desired. If you’re comfortable having a professional nurse or caregiver visit for 2 hours once a week, that is doable; however, if you want a compassionate, attentive, highly-trained caregiver to be with your loved one 24/7, that’s also possible. In fact, it’s not uncommon to create an open room for a caregiving to live at the senior resident’s home and be there in order to care for them at any time for any circumstance. There’s much more flexibility with in-home assisted living and the one-on-one time desired for your loved one.

On the same note, traditional care can also be a temporary option for those seeking some form of physical rehabilitation. If your loved one has undergone surgeries or have suffered from a stroke, fall, or head injury, only temporary traditional care may be needed. Short-term care specialists and therapists at senior rehabilitation centers like St. Anthony Cares state that sometimes for certain situations, physical therapy and rehabilitation are also just as crucial to bring residents back to optimum health and prevent such accidents from recurring. In some cases, opting for short-term care solely for rehabilitation from injuries can be the type of care needed so long as the resident can fully recover.

If you find that your loved one is a specialty case that needs round the clock medical attention, perhaps opting for traditional home care with certified specialists around 24/7 is more suitable. Not everyone can afford a professional medical setup in their own home and so traditional homes can fill in that void. So depending on your elderly loved one’s needs, traditional assisted living in a home may be better suited in order to give them the medical attention they will need to live more comfortably.

Individual People, Individualized Services

A nursing home environment has a set schedule for their meals, snacks, time to get dressed and out of bed, and activities. While at first this may seem appealing, the lack of flexibility often leads to nurses’ aides feeling rushed to get from room to room to ensure everyone is bathed and dressed – even when, perhaps, a resident feels like staying in bed for a few hours more. Further, if a resident misses a meal because he/she was visiting with family or dealing with a personal hygiene situation, it’s not uncommon for the person to go without the meal completely. The Ohio Department of Aging addresses this very real issue at nursing homes and advocates for de-institutionalizing nursing homes and transforming them into person-centered care facilities. Being on such a strict schedule can leave little room for the unexpected and patients not having a great day to begin with can be put in an even testier mood when forced to participate at times they don’t wish to. But don’t fret, not all traditional assisted living homes operate in this manner. If traditional senior homes are the route you and your elderly loved one are seeking, there are plenty of homes out available in most cities that offer much more flexible schedules and allow seniors to go about the property at their own leisure. Kitchens or cafeterias operate within certain hours or can postpone meals for particular residents that enjoy them later or earlier in the day. Snacks are on hand so long as the cafeteria is open and there are no set or mandatory activities or intermingling involved if the resident doesn’t want to participate.

With in-home assisted living, the resident is within their own property and are able to have their caregiver prepare meals or snacks whenever desired so long as it’s within their doctor’s recommended diet regimen. Each day can be different and the monotony of a daily routine doesn’t have to exist if the resident wants to do a different activity each day. Sleeping in isn’t an issue on days they are a little more tired than normal – there really isn’t a set schedule and if there is one provided by the caregiver from the doctor’s recommendations, it’s easy to move things around or find the time to ensure your senior doesn’t lose sight of the comfort provided within the boundaries of their own home. More and more families are looking deeper into in-home assisted living to provide maximum comfort for their loved ones with mental health issues. Depending on the severity and how the family is able to cope, providing your senior with a setting he/she is familiar with can lead to more good days than bad. Although the demand for taking on a role as a caregiver can be high for family members, opting for a professional to live in the home and be there to help assist them at any time of the day or night can do wonders. Those with unstable mental health may not do very well if they’re put on a daily schedule as they would find in a traditional nursing home whereas each day could be a different experience within the contentment offered by their own home they’re more familiar with.

Whichever you choose, ensure the decision is what’s best for your senior. Specialized nursing homes could be a great option if your elderly loved one can benefit from having around the clock care and can harmonize with other residents in the same scenario. Depending on their conditions and their state of health, short-term care may be what they need until they recover from previous injuries or pain and they can then continue on with normal life at home with the family. Or perhaps in-home assisted living is what’s needed for your loved one. Maybe they only need a specialist to visit once a day, twice a week, or perhaps they need someone around 24/7 and provide care from within the home at any accommodating time. There are many options out there that can cater to the medical needs and overall well-being of your loved one. We’re here to help you explore those options.

In collaboration with Amanda Kaestner.