‘Healthcare’ Posts

Can the Health Care Reform Really Help with Long Term Care?

October 24th, 2016 by Doris Bersing

healthcare reformThe health care system plays a very important role for every country around the world. Through well-established rules and laws as well as a good health reform, the long term care can and should be constantly improved. This way, every citizen of every country might benefit from the best health care conditions no matter the situation. There are numerous factors that add up to the equation. All of these highly influence the overall results of the quality of national long term care. Let’s analyze this more in detail below.

The Effects of the Well-being of the Families on the Stability of the National Economy

A good, effective health care system is first of all good for the citizens of any country or better said for any human being on Earth. We all need medical care sooner or later and a perfectly established system can only prove to be beneficial for us. Moreover, when families in a certain state are doing well from this point of view as well as others, this is also highly beneficial for the overall quality of the national economy.

All these factors go hand in hand. As a result, when all details are carefully considered, the end-results are noticeable and beneficial both for the citizens and the country they live in. The nation’s economic stability highly depends on the well-being of its inhabitants. Moreover, it is also influenced by proper support systems ensured for people dealing with health disabilities. These focus on offering them the chance to integrate well in society.

The state in itself could not help with long term care better than by imposing effective health reforms. These should be developed for the citizens and by keeping their needs and requirements as the main concern and focus. The factors involved in this case are numerous and varied. However, proper care for patients should always be on top of the list. As a result, every new rule and any new system should come accordingly.

A Good Health Reform for Restoring National Prosperity

The reality is that many people are skeptical when they hear about the health reform. Their concerns are not necessarily related to the existence of the health reform but rather to how effective it might actually be for the overall national well-being.

There is nothing wrong with the concept itself. However, it is more than important to make sure that the rules will ensure the well-being of the country and its citizens. Moreover, such changes should not bring any negative effects or leave any type of needs uncovered. The purpose is to restore prosperity for families as well as the national economy and the fiscal health.

A well-established health reform developed by specialists with both theoretical and practical experience is essential. Furthermore, it will ensure affordable health care for everyone. Moreover, it is also vital for slowing general price growth in the case of health entitlement programs

expenditure

Focus on the Needs of People Who Need Long-Term Care

When it comes to long-term care, a health reform becomes even more important and necessary. Why is that? Because these people need a perfect system to ensure that their needs are fully covered the entire period of time they need proper care. It is not about going to the doctor for a single visit or treatment in their case. They need constant assistance, proper medication availability and prescriptions. They also need people specialized in offering them the support they need.

Furthermore, the need for long-term care is not just limited to people reaching their senior age. There are also numerous adults and young people dealing with health issues that require long-term care. A health reform should include all these situations and establish the perfect conditions for all citizens. No need to just encourage families to plan ahead. These people need serious, realistic solutions that will be advantageous both for them and the national economy system.

A Serious National Concern

All in all, the great majority of Medicaid spending goes for appropriate services for long-term care patients. A good health reform could target such needs of the population. This would allow it to strengthen the healthcare requirements of the citizens thus ensure a stronger Medicaid system for the future.

There arealso certain Medicaid post-acute type of care services that could find place in the system. These could fill-in for certain long-term care needs that might be uncovered at the moment due to system breaches. There are effective solutions to find and adopt such as good care homes in London but this is only possible through a well-established system like the national health reform.

Feeling forgetful? Tips for seniors to preserve their mental abilities

March 10th, 2016 by Doris Bersing

Our associate Edward FrancisBrain Changes explains here few important tips for seniors to preserve their mental abilities when feeling forgetful. He says, “….If you’ve recently noticed that you’re going through some thinking issues, it could mean that your mental abilities are decreasing. Are you having issues remembering where you put your house keys? Do you struggle remembering what you did yesterday? These are common changes that the brain may be experiencing as you age…” But we could ask: how can seniors distinguish common thinking issues from severe health conditions linked to mental stability such as Alzheimer’s or dementia?

Understanding the brain and its functions

As you age, your brain’s volume begins to shrink. As soon as this happens, the nerve cells inside your brain may lose connections with your other nerve cells and just shrink. The blood flowing through the brain loses intensity as we age. This is an age-related change that is believed to be the root cause of cognitive decline. It is perfectly normal to experience memory lapses every now and then; however significant memory loss is not part of the aging process. It is important to make an appointment with a physician and know for sure whether or not your memory loss is a sign of cognitive decline or not. Cognitive symptoms that get in the way of your daily activities must not be overlooked as these will interfere with your daily activities.

Changes in the brain that might trigger dementia

Dementia is a form of cognitive decline in mental abilities, including language skills, reasoning, memory, perception and judgment. The causes are different from patient to patient. Alzheimer’s in particular, is one of the most common forms of dementia. It materializes when the brain’s nerve cells deteriorate and die. Vascular dementia on the other hand, happens when the brain’s nerve fibers are damaged by cardiovascular or cerebrovascular problems, most commonly strokes.

Tips for seniors to prevent cognitive decline

Promising medical research shows that taking into consideration the following steps might help preserve your mental abilities as you get older.

  • Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels under control – adhere to a healthier lifestyle. Exclude unhealthy carbohydrates, sugar and salt from your diet, and focus your attention on eating more vegetables and fruits. Drink plenty of water, and exercise regularly. Daily walking for 30 minutes or swimming should keep your blood pumping and your cholesterol levels under control.
  • Quit smoking & alcohol consumption – both smoking and alcohol consumption may increase your chances of developing dementia as you age. It’s ok to have a glass of wine in the evening, but make sure to drink in moderation.
  • Work out – regular physical activity is believed to help preserve adequate blood flow into the brain; daily activities that keep the blood pumping may reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure, an ailment directly linked to developing dementia.
  • Keep your brain stimulated – mental stimulation is vital for your brain health. Stay active by boosting your degree of social interaction. Play challenging games (chess, solve puzzles) and engage in daily activities to keep your brain engaged.

Poor concentration can be a major cause for memory loss. Seniors can start forgetting things when their brains are not properly stimulated. Boredom and lack of stimulation may be a trigger for developing severe anxiety and depression. That’s why it is fundamental for seniors to find activities that can sustain mental stability. Reading books, solving puzzles, and playing chess should definitely be checked out.

Home care and professional healthcare

Many seniors don’t want to admit that they can’t manage on their own anymore, and they would do anything to preserve their independence for as long as possible. That’s not always the smartest thing you can do. If you’re becoming forgetful it’s best to ask for help. Turn to your family and friends, and consider home care. Hiring a caregiver to help you with your grocery shopping, daily home maintenance and cleaning might also be a great idea.

Bottom line is, we can’t put an end to the aging process; and whether we like it or not at some point in life our brains will deteriorate. Most people are terrified of nursing homes; they don’t want to be left alone in a place filled with stranger. And yet, the idea of care homes is not as scary as it seems. There are comfortable facilities where you can enjoy an active lifestyle, interact with people your age, and live a happy and fulfilling life. All you have to do is take a leap of faith!

Healthy Diet for Seniors and its Benefits

November 21st, 2015 by Doris Bersing

healthy foods for seniorsOur regular collaborator, Edward Francis with Supplemented.co.uk alerts us that trying to stay healthy as we age can be a bit of a challenge, and it’s even more difficult to try and encourage someone else to be healthy. He says: “…But there are many benefits of having a healthy diet as a senior, so it’s definitely worth the effort. Here’s just a few of the main benefits of having a healthy diet as a senior:

Reduce Risk of Heart Issues

As we get older, our heart is already at a higher risk of suffering from issues – whether that’s heart attacks, heart disease or other similar problems. Making sure you have a healthy diet is one way to lower these risks and keep your heart in top shape. But what exactly is a heart healthy diet? Portion size is important here – eating too much of even the best things isn’t great for you. There’s no need to cut the size so much that you’re hungry, but learning not to overfill your plate is a great foundation for building a healthy diet on. Other key aspects of a heart healthy diet include eating more fruit and vegetables, swapping to whole grains, and limiting unhealthy fats. It’s important to note that it’s only unhealthy fats – there’s no need to cut out fat altogether!

Have More Energy

It’s common for older people to begin to feel lethargic and low on energy. Part of this is simply because of aging, but it’s often something worsened by underlying issues – such as depression, or a poor diet. Swapping to a healthier diet is a quick way to give yourself an energy boost. If this is the main benefit that interests you, there are some specific tips you should follow. Firstly, make sure you’re eating breakfast! This is a vital part of both eating healthily and keeping your energy rates high. If you’re really struggling to eat a full meal in the mornings, even snacking on a breakfast bar is better than not eating. Complex carbohydrates are a must – starchy foods such as potatoes are a great source of these. And finally – make sure you’re drinking plenty of water. Being dehydrated saps away energy, and making sure you’re drinking lots throughout the day is a great way to feel refreshed.

Strong Bones

One risk for seniors is brittle bones – it’s why there’s an increased risk of hip fractures from falls, for instance. Whilst this isn’t entirely avoidable, it is possible to lessen the impact by ensuring you’re eating correctly. Calcium and vitamin D are the most important things to consider here. Vitamin D is often hard to get enough of through diet alone, so we recommend taking a supplement in order to ensure you reap the benefits. As for calcium, milk and yogurt are key sources, but you should also consider increasing the amount of green leafy vegetables and nuts that you eat, as these are great secondary sources. It’s also important to remain active – in this case, diet can only go so far, so making sure you get a regular amount of exercise (even if it’s only a small amount) is vital.

Keep Your Mind Sharp

There’s a lot of discussion on the best way to keep your mind sharp as you age – from doing sudoku to taking long walks. One thing everyone agrees on though is that your diet plays a massive part of it. Starting to eat more healthily can has major benefits for your mind, and if you’re concerned about issues like dementia or Alzheimer’s, then it’s a quick and easy change with a big impact. If this is the thing you’re most concerned about, then a big thing to add into your diet is omega-3s. Foods like salmon are the obvious choice, but did you know you can also get the same effects from flax seeds? Green tea is another worthwhile addition, as it’s great for countering free radicals – the things most likely to be responsible for age-related mind issues.

These are just a few of the potential benefits gained from having a healthy diet – there are many more, and it’s something worth discussing with a medical professional if you have any queries about. Just be aware that the portions deemed healthy for a senior are likely to differ from what’s considered healthy for a younger adult, so make sure to do the research and not overload with food by mistake. Everything calls, of course for balance. That what you like and that what you must have versus what improves your quality of life. A difficult balance to keep and yet, a token for quality of life.

 

Presentation – Dementia: Legal and Medical Aspects

October 15th, 2015 by Doris Bersing

Elizabeth Krivatsy, Esq. and Elizabeth Landsverk, MD

Dementias of all kinds are wreaking havoc with the lives of individuals and families today. The more you know about the medical and legal repercussions involving the diagnoses of Dementia, and the sooner planning begins, the stronger the safety net we can create for our loved one, ourselves and our families.

Elizabeth Krivatsy, Esq. is an estate planning and elder law attorney, who is passionate about helping people plan for the best possible future, preparing for personal care and financial management during times of incapacity, and choosing their life in retirement. A graduate of the UC Hastings College of the Law, Elizabeth has served clients in the San Francisco Bay Area for 23 years.
www.krivatsylaw.com

Elizabeth Landsverk, MD. Dr. Landsverk has over twenty years of experience in providing medical care to the elderly. She is board-certified in Internal, Geriatric, and Palliative Care Medicine. As a House Calls Geriatrician, she collaborates with local physicians to address the needs of complicated vulnerable elders to alleviate pain, agitation and discomfort. Dr. Landsverk is a graduate of Stanford University and trained at Cambridge Hospital, Harvard University.
www.elderconsult.com

Date/Time
Thursday, November 5, 2015, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Location
Mill Valley Recreation Center
180 Camino Alto
Mill Valley, CA 94941
RSVP
Limited seating, please call 1-800-805-7104 to reserve a space.

Our Long-Term Care Journey

April 14th, 2015 by Doris Bersing

Aging in PlaceMaking a life-changing decision on a loved one’s long-term care and considering a nursing home or assisted living facility is never easy and there are many hurdles that must be overcome. For many, this may not be necessary as they will receive the care they require in the comfort of their own home, which is certainly the first option for a large percentage of seniors receiving care.

According to an AARP study 89% of those 65 and older would love to age in place for as long as possible, and there are several important benefits of aging at home, like improved health, routine, independence and the familiar setting. If medically and financially possible, there is no place like home. In-home care can be affordable, when limited in services and in number of hours per day.

For low income seniors, there are several programs, like the In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program, the Cash and Counsel program, or if you or your family member is a US veteran, the VA administration for veterans may cover a variety of in home care services in your state. Services that are typically covered by these programs include, health care, personal care, homemaker care, adult day care, transportation, medical equipment and some minor home remodeling.

For those that prefer a group setting, or home care is not appropriate and/or affordable, and the family feels that a nursing home or assisted living facility would be the be the best fit, obviously there are many emotional issues that need to be dealt with. Often there are conflicting emotions raging, including, guilt, anger, sadness and helplessness, when they are no longer able to provide the care that their loved ones now require.

Another area that needs to be navigated when considering a nursing home, is how to pay the bill, which for many American families is financially out of reach even after saving up for a considerable number of years. The same situation arises with home care services; unless the person has savings, equity in their home, or Long Term care Insurance, cost can be an issue. The federal and state governments provide Medicaid/Medical help if the individual meets all financial and medical eligibility guidelines. There is often a grueling task, companies like Senior Planning Services could help you with the Medicaid application process, or you can address your local Medicaid office, often, with the risk of failure quite high.

Last but no least, there are considerations as far as choosing the right nursing home or assisted living facility for mom or dad, to the right in-home care agency that will take into account all personal, cultural, religious and location-based preferences. This accumulation of stress is enough to inundate any sane person, but for the nearly 65 million heroic individuals providing care in the US for a loved one, this is often the best care option for the senior.Having worked for many years as a nursing home placement coordinator for a NJ-based Medicaid planning company, I’d like to share the personal saga of one of our clients which touched me deeply.

Several months ago I was contacted by a woman living in northern New Jersey. Her mom, who resided in central NJ in Ocean County, was suffering from severe dementia and the daughter wanted her admitted to a nursing home in her own area, up in northern NJ, in Bergen County. In addition to her dementia, the elderly woman also had severe behavioral issues.

The family was in the Medicaid application process and their application was in the pending status. Because of her unique needs, our options were quite limited. We needed a nursing home with a secure unit where the residents could not wander out of the unit, since a wander guard would not have been sufficient for this woman. Dementia patients tend to become so confused and lost in their surroundings, that they will try to leave the premises even when wheelchair bound.

The woman, as we mentioned earlier, also had violent tendencies and would sometimes act disrespectfully, hit other residents and caregivers, and needed a nursing facility that was equipped for these needs. These issues made finding the right facility a nightmare.

When we did find one or two, we were turned down, since our Medicaid status was still pending and not all nursing homes were willing to work with Medicaid-pending applicants.

In the meantime, we found placement for the woman in a nursing home in the Ocean County area which was able to provide all of her needs. I had a good working relationship with this facility and, after some cajoling, they accepted her, confident that the Medicaid application would be approved. It didn’t satisfy the requests of the daughter, though, who wanted mom close by.

When the Medicaid application was subsequently approved, we were successful in transferring the woman to a facility closer to her daughter in Bergen County. We were all very excited that it had worked out well for everybody, at last. The daughter thanked me profusely for the effort I had expended in making it happen.

It was heartbreaking when, days later, the woman passed away at the facility…

Conclusion: You know, as professionals, we try to maintain a certain degree of detachment in order to be better able to assist our clients, but at the end of the day… it’s painful. We do develop relationships with the wonderful people whose long-term care is entrusted to us and when they go so quickly, it’s like losing a friend or relative, in a sense.

In collaboration with Benjamin Lamm, a senior advocate.

Cancer: you are not alone

April 9th, 2015 by Doris Bersing

The right teamA diagnosis of cancer is terrifying and often it is a long journey for patients, clinicians, and family members to look at the available options for treatment and care. Cancer patients often feel more comfortable and secure being cared for at home. Many patients want to stay at home so they will not be separated from family, friends, and familiar surroundings. Home care can help patients achieve this desire but cancer care often involves a team approach that includes doctors, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, family members, and others but one size does not fit all and looking for the right team is the key.

More than one million people living in the US are diagnosed with cancer each year – one million people, just like you, who will embark upon a journey of treatment, recuperation, and rehabilitation. It can feel, at times, like a lonely journey, and cancer survivors are often struck by the feelings of isolation and helplessness that are so prevalent during their diagnosis and treatment. However, it is important to know that you are not alone; we are here to share your journey.

There have been some huge developments in the world of cancer research in recent years; from new drugs to the discovery of what causes certain types of cancer, the medical profession is forging ahead in the field of research and pharmaceuticals. However, this news often comes as little comfort to those who may recently have been diagnosed with cancer – your first thoughts will probably be towards your own recovery, and the help available to you, rather than scientific progress, and that is absolutely where your mind should be.

Cancer: where can you turn?

Support comes in a variety of forms, from financial and medical assistance, to help with traveling to and from work, or daily tasks, such as shopping, cooking, or household chores. Where should you turn for support? The obvious answer is often friends and family, and it is those closest to you who will often be there to pick up the pieces following a cancer diagnosis; their dedicated rallying is invaluable at this time, so never be afraid to accept, or ask, for help. Living Well supports a team approach when caring for cancer patients at home.

If you are without a local network of friends and family, or have found it difficult to approach anyone for help, there are a host of organizations that are dedicated to helping those in your shoes. Charities such as The American Cancer Society, The American Association for Cancer Research, and The Cancer Research Institute provide invaluable information and services, including advice on your diagnosis and treatment options, financial guidance, manned helplines, and details on support groups and health services that are local to you; wherever you are, their aim is to connect you with somebody who will listen.

Assisted living: there is somewhere else to turn

There may come a time during your treatment or recuperation when assisted living is suggested, or even prescribed, by a health care professional. While the phrase may conjure images you may not wish to associate with your own situation, assisted living can help to quell worries of living alone, help you to cope with daily tasks, support you during times of loneliness and isolation, and assist you in accessing support. Assisted living can be the supportive environment that you need, allowing you to channel all of your energy into recovery. Whether provided on a temporary or permanent basis, assisted living often becomes a vital lifeline to those experiencing physical or mental changes, and can make recovery much easier when a person’s home no longer has suitable amenities to facilitate treatment.

The most important thing to remember following any diagnosis, particularly that of cancer, is that you are not alone; whether you are being comforted and supported by family, assisted by a dedicated charity, or cared for by home care staff or an assisted living complex, never be afraid to lean on those around you.

Physician recommends “A ‘Code Death’ for Dying Patients”

April 11th, 2014 by Doris Bersing

In a New York Times Well blog post, critical and palliative care physician Dr. Zitter recommends that “physicians need to relearn the ancient art of dying.”